UTTERLY RANDOM IN BERLIN

it's whatever strikes my fancy, innit?

thedailywhat:

Kids Reenact The Darndest Sports Moments of the Day: In what can only be described as an act of war against Red Sox Nation, these young Kenyans (and possible Mets fans) recently saw fit to reenact Bill Buckner’s infamous error from the 1986 World Series.

Wishing to “make a movie about a famous sports event,” the kids of course chose something that would force Bostonians to simultaneously relive their worst nightmare while being unable to express anger, because honestly, who can be mad at Kenyan children?

[thebuzz]

hahahaha!!

(Source: thedailywhat)

Caroline Elkins, a professor at Harvard, spent nearly 10 years compiling the evidence contained in her book Britain’s Gulag: the Brutal End of Empire in Kenya. She started her research with the belief that the British account of the suppression of the Kikuyu’s Mau Mau revolt in the 1950s was largely accurate. Then she discovered that most of the documentation had been destroyed. She worked through the remaining archives, and conducted 600 hours of interviews with Kikuyu survivors – rebels and loyalists – and British guards, settlers and officials. Her book is fully and thoroughly documented. It won the Pulitzer prize. But as far as Sandbrook, James and other imperial apologists are concerned, it might as well never have been written.

Deny the British empire’s crimes? No, we ignore them | George Monbiot | Comment is free | The Guardian

Elkins reveals that the British detained not 80,000 Kikuyu, as the official histories maintain, but almost the entire population of one and a half million people, in camps and fortified villages. There, thousands were beaten to death or died from malnutrition, typhoid, tuberculosis and dysentery. In some camps almost all the children died.

The inmates were used as slave labour. Above the gates were edifying slogans, such as “Labour and freedom” and “He who helps himself will also be helped”. Loudspeakers broadcast the national anthem and patriotic exhortations. People deemed to have disobeyed the rules were killed in front of the others. The survivors were forced to dig mass graves, which were quickly filled. Unless you have a strong stomach I advise you to skip the next paragraph.

Interrogation under torture was widespread. Many of the men were anally raped, using knives, broken bottles, rifle barrels, snakes and scorpions. A favourite technique was to hold a man upside down, his head in a bucket of water, while sand was rammed into his rectum with a stick. Women were gang-raped by the guards. People were mauled by dogs and electrocuted. The British devised a special tool which they used for first crushing and then ripping off testicles. They used pliers to mutilate women’s breasts. They cut off inmates’ ears and fingers and gouged out their eyes. They dragged people behind Land Rovers until their bodies disintegrated. Men were rolled up in barbed wire and kicked around the compound.

How Africa tweets: visualised | News | guardian.co.uk

thedailywhat:

Genuine Happiness of the Day: Redditor TheLakesnapped this heartwarming photo of a Kenyan kindergartner who just finger-painted for the very first time.
They explain:

I took this photo while studying abroad in Kenya during the Spring of 2010. A few friends and I were about to climb Mt. Longonot when we stumbled upon a pre-primary (kindergarten) school. A week later we returned with school supplies for the 30+ students who attended the school. We have since started a non-profit organization to raise money to provide the children with a daily meal, school supplies, de-worming medicine, and a new school.

Thanks to the nonprofit, construction of a brand new school for the kids is scheduled to begin in January.
[reddit.]

That is one of the most genuinely happy smiles I’ve ever seen!! Well done.

thedailywhat:

Genuine Happiness of the Day: Redditor TheLakesnapped this heartwarming photo of a Kenyan kindergartner who just finger-painted for the very first time.

They explain:

I took this photo while studying abroad in Kenya during the Spring of 2010. A few friends and I were about to climb Mt. Longonot when we stumbled upon a pre-primary (kindergarten) school. A week later we returned with school supplies for the 30+ students who attended the school. We have since started a non-profit organization to raise money to provide the children with a daily meal, school supplies, de-worming medicine, and a new school.

Thanks to the nonprofit, construction of a brand new school for the kids is scheduled to begin in January.

[reddit.]

That is one of the most genuinely happy smiles I’ve ever seen!! Well done.

(Source: thedailywhat)

Maathai was a pioneer from an early age and in many spheres. After winning a scholarship to study in the US, she returned to a newly independent Kenya, becoming the first woman in east and central Africa to obtain a PhD. Maathai was also the first woman professor the University of Nairobi, where she taught veterinary medicine. Her work with voluntary groups alerted her to the struggles of women in rural Kenya, and it quickly became her life’s cause. Noticing how the rapid environmental degradation was affecting women’s lives, she encouraged them to plant trees to ensure future supplies of firewood and to protect water sources and crops. Maathai’s agenda quickly widened as she joined the struggle against the repressive and corrupt regime of Daniel arap Moi. Her efforts to stop powerful politicians grabbing land, especially forests, brought her into conflict with the authorities, and she was beaten and arrested numerous times. Her bravery and defiance made her a hero in Kenya.

Wangari Muta Maathai (1940-2011)